Tag Archive: asafa powell


Lightening Bolt

Usain Bolt

Usain Bolt

The 12th staging of the IAAF World Championship is currently on the go in Berlin, Germany. Thousands of athletes have travelled to the city to prove they are still the best and the competition is on. Track and Field has been given a boost because of Jamaicans like Usain Bolt. He continues to break records and show us what humans can do over the 100m. Yesterday he clocked a new world record of 9.58secs over the 100m. The track and field world stood still (the entire Jamaica) and watched as their local and international hero smashed his world record once again.

Usain Bolt has done tremendous work for the area of track and field. Jamaica is known for their activities in many areas of sports like athletics, soccer, netball, etc. The amazing runs by Bolt and others on the Jamaican team have marketed the sport to the point where young kids are seeing sports as a viable field. Prior to Beijing’s Olympic success, track and field was dominated by Americans. Now, the sport is dominated 100% by Jamaicans who have now risen to the top of their games. Many are seeing this rise in athletics of the Jamaicans to the success of the drug testing in the sport. Jamaican athletes are blessed with an amazing talent and coaches who have honed their talent in grooming top athletes for the world stage.

Is the run by Bolt humane? He makes it look so easy and the exciting thing about it is that he is absolutely a clean athlete. As a Jamaican I am extremely proud of my country again because of the successes of Usain Bolt and other athletes on the world stage. They have done extremely well and their efforts must be rewarded. Many athletes around the world

The scintillating run by Usain Bolt to stop the clock at 9.58secs is simply mind boggling. How can he go so fast? How much faster can he go? We sit and wait for the next championship and see what Bolt has in store. The Bolts of Lightening will strike yet again.

Drugged Athletes

Becoming an Olympian is the ultimate reward for any athlete. By Michael Diamond

Kobe Bryant

Kobe Bryant

We all have our favourite professional athletes and we all have our favourite sporting activities. For many, fans idolize these athletes where they become role models and inspiration for most people. But what happens when these athletes are accused of taking banned substances? Are the different sporting areas affected, and how can we erase or decrease athletes taking these substances that not only put a stain on their careers but also the sports they participated in?

For those who enter professional sport arena they have a huge responsibility. They are charged with the duties to remain clean – drug free, role models, and also to enhance the appeal of the sport by performing excellently. However, over the years many athletes have secretly used banned substances to cheat the sporting officials and the world by exceeding expectations. With these drugs injected and taken orally they (athletes) are able to perform above normal athletes who would not have been on drugs. The cases of drugged athletes are not contained to one sport, its spread across the board.

Personally, I have a problem with drugged athletes. Professional sporting bodies have formed boards and bodies to combat the use of drugs in sports. However, athletes seem to elude the officials and people set to investigate these occurrences. They put a taint not only on their successful careers but also the credibility of the sport itself. Promoters get millions of dollars for each meet, game, championship with years later hearing that the race, game you watched and adored will become null and void. The perception of having a clean drug free sport seems to be a fantasy idea today.

To remedy the situation the official bodies set to oversee this process have developed punishments. What is more surprising though is that in track and field there is a grading for banned substances. One would like to think that once a drug can advance or increase your abilities to exceed performance it would have the same rating like other dangerous drugs. This is the confused signal that the boards send and will motivate athletes to take drugs since all you will get is a slap on the wrist. Recently, five professional athletes in Jamaica was tested positive for taking banned substances. However, since the drugs taken have a Grade B rating all the athletes will get is a warning. Most argue that the athletes’ careers are tainted and get most of the slack. To this end, actually the sport gets most of the slack for not ensuring that the athletes are drug free and that the credibility of the race, game or championship is withheld.

If the boards set up to catch the perpetrators are doing so late then it makes sense to legalize banned drugs. It might seem ludicrous but when millions of fans take time out of their schedules to participate in events and then hear their favourite race, record set, game was scared by drugged athletes it doesn’t add up, it’s a failure. If sport administrators pledge to fans of their credibility, drug free athletes then they should be able to deliver on that target set. More must be done to ensure that athletes who participate do so drug free not damaging a sport’s reputation. These druggists must be stopped. They (athletes and coaches) know the rules and know which drugs are in products. They deliberately take drugs to outperform other legal athletes and get all the glory (awards, media coverage); which lasts only for a moment until what was done in the dark comes to the light of the world.

If they cannot guarantee drug free athletes to their millions of fans then they (administrators) should legalize banned substances. Whether it is Tour de France, Track and Field, Baseball, Tennis, Swimming, Horse racing you name it, they have a duty to ensure they live up to their set standards. I want to know that when I have watched a race, game, championship that the thought of an athlete being on drug is ludicrous, a non-issue, a dead story. It should be irrelevant. I should be able to trust the results and not think what I saw was a blatant lie.